It’s pretty but …

It’s pretty but …..

Sometimes when out thrifting you can find something pretty but it just needs a little extra to take it to he next level.

Here is an example that I found earlier this week.

I love this rose oil painting but it looks a bit 1970’s in its faux gilt frame. I knew it had potential but needed to be given the Lexi treatment!

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I thought I would paint the frame in a vintage-esque colour by the wonderful English paint manufacturer Farrow and Ball to soften the look.

If you want to have a go:

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Firstly take your sandpaper and rub all over the frame. Don’t forget the sides and try and get into all the comers. Sanding it like this allows the paint to stick to the frame.

When you have finished sanding make sure you wipe any dust off as you don’t want bits in your fresh paint.

Mask off next to the very edge of the frame on the painting with newspaper and masking tape to make it easier to paint the inside edges of the frame. If you have a steady hand you can risk it and not bother …..brave move!

I painted the frame with a white paint as an undercoat to blank out the gold colour. With darker paints you may not need to bother but with pastels it is a necessary.

With this particular frame I used emulsion which I know is normally for walls but I wanted a more chalky finish to this frame. Also the coats dry so quickly, it can easily be completed in an afternoon which for any busy crafter is a big deal !

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Now you can get cracking with your top paint colour. I went for a soft pink from Farrow and Ball. It is named Middleton Pink but has nothing to do with Kate, the most famous Middleton of them all !

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Make sure you let each coat dry well between applications. On the day I painted this frame it was sunny and breezy so it dried really quickly. Usually two coats is plenty.

When the frame is really dry you can GENTLY rub back areas of the frame to distress it a little but I didn’t with this one. Rub back in the corners and along the sides to reveal the colours underneath. It can look great and instantly ages painted items and they don’t look so flat.

Here are some examples from a seller on Etsy but sadly there is no seller name on Google images to credit him or her.

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This is how the 70’s rose painting looks now its done. Pretty and less shiny and altogether a softer more feminine look.

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And here it is in place on a wall with a number of other vintage oil paintings. A painted frame really sets a painting off nicely . Have a go, it so easy and looks so fabulous.

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Have a great weekend everyone

Lexi xx

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Elbow Patches – not just for geography teachers!

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I adore an elbow patch !

I’ve jumpers with plain oval patches, a cashmere cardi with gold leather patches and a navy and white striped Maison Scotch top with navy stars on the elbows. Once I even had a jumper with SEQUIN elbow patches. It was a beauty!

You can imagine my delight when I found this grey striped top with red HEARTS on the sleeve in Gap. It was a ‘must have’ purchase and the fact it was on sale was the final deciding factor.

You can easily put cool patches onto your own clothes. Below you can see the pink star patches I put into a friends cardi.

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All I did was iron on some Bondaweb on the back of the cotton fabric. Cut out a patch in whatever shape you desire. I used pinking sheers to ensure there was no fraying.

Check where you are placing the patch on the sleeve. Need to match up to your elbow position !

Lie the garment flat on your ironing board and make sure the sleeves are lying flat too. Peel the paper off the back of the patch and place where you want them. Press with a hot iron without steam and allow the Bondaweb to fuse to the garment underneath. You may like to cover with a tea towel to protect the fabrics underneath.

Leave it a couple of minutes to cool down and remove tea towel. That’s it !

Being cautious as I didn’t know how the patch would stand up to the washing machine, I used some lime green embroidery silk to put a running stitch around the edge of the patch, about 1cm in to secure the patch a little more.

It also is a great design feature, I love contrasting stitching. Adds a little something.

Happy customising and show your Geography teacher how to rock an elbow patch!

L xx

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